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NOV 12TH 2018 · #TRIPREPORT CABO· PELAGIC SAFARI

NOV 12TH 2018 · #TRIPREPORT CABO· PELAGIC SAFARI

We are excited to announce our latest Safari trip report from the stretch of coast between Cabo San Lucas and Los Cabos –a really tiny baby Humpback Whale accompanied by their proud mothers! It was a unique moment of hope and joy of life!

Here the first photo taken this season of a mother and baby humpback whale.

 

The depths and many sheltered bays along this stretch of the Cabo San Lucas coast may be why the mothers choose to nurse their babies in safety.

The baby whales are typically 10 to 12 feet in length, the mother giving birth to just one calf. The baby nurses from the mother, just like most mammals, in this case for at least 7 months. On our Pelagic Safari you can really see the wide beam on the females, either carrying a calf or having put on a lot of weight to ensure 7 plus months of fat to turn into milk for their babies.

As for the rest of the whales, the Humpbacks have continued their awesome display of breaching and slapping, the males doing their best to attract the attention of the females in the hopes of mating.

Some mothers appear more protective of their calves, staying away from a vessel. Others, on the other hand, are more relaxed and will approach a vessel with their calves.

Mothers are also very protective of their calves in the presence of one or several escorts, often swimming between her calf and escort(s), as she may be harassed by the escort exhibiting vigorous and aggressive behavior such as head lunges. If more than one escort is present, the individual defending the position closest to the female is often referred to as the “primary escort” and the others as “secondary escorts.”

At that point in time, the calves now called “yearlings”, will become independent while on the feeding grounds or in route to the breeding grounds. Some may even accompany their mothers back to the breeding grounds. Once there, they would have completed their first round migration, one of many to come throughout their lifetime.

What a beautiful day !

Pelagic Safari Team

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